Robyn Wright Dunbar, Ph.D.

 

DIRECTOR of CTL and Associate Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education

Robyn Dunbar, Ph.D.

Leads CTL with a particular focus on strengthening a campus culture that prizes research-informed learning as well as teaching.

 

 

CONTACT INFORMATION

414 Sweet Hall, MC: 3087
590 Escondido Mall
Stanford, CA  94305-3087
Phone: (650) 723-3920
Fax: (650) 725-9580
robyn.dunbar@stanford.edu

ABOUT ROBYN

Robyn Wright Dunbar received a B.A. in geology from Trinity University followed by an M.A. in Antarctic marine geology and Ph.D. in geology from Rice University. During the course of her graduate work, Robyn participated in five Antarctic research cruises and holds the distinction of being one of the first two women to conduct Antarctic marine research aboard a U.S. Coast Guard icebreaker. By the time she received her Ph.D., Robyn’s research, her career, and her soul had shifted to the ancient rock record and the spectacular geology of the Four Corners area. Robyn was a faculty member in geology at the University of New Mexico and at Rice University before coming to Stanford.

Robyn joined Stanford’s Center for Teaching and Learning in 1999 as its Assistant Director for Science and Engineering. Since 2013, Robyn is Associate Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education and Director of CTL. She leads CTL to promote understanding of how people learn and to ensure that research-based principles find expression in the active practices and public conversations of both students and instructors.

Beyond her work at Stanford, Robyn has made contributions to academic career preparation and academic leadership through her roles in On the Cutting Edge:  Preparing for an Academic Career and WEBS (Women Evolving Biological Sciences). On the personal side of things, Robyn enjoys time with her husband (and Stanford professor) Rob Dunbar, her two wonderful sons, and way too many longhaired dogs and cats. Along with Rob, she has participated in numerous Stanford Travel Study trips to exotic destinations and enjoys the mesa country, gardening, and turning over rocks.