Instructor News: November 2017

Instructor News: November 2017

Even amid the hectic start of fall quarter, many of our lecturers continued contributing in person and in writing to ongoing professional conversations across the nation.
 
Kathleen Tarr was honored as an Exceptional Woman by Alturas and spoke at the Institute's “Uniting Women Across Generations” (09/21-22/2017) in Sun Valley, Idaho. With fellow participants Caroline Heldman and Christine Walker, Kathleen co-authored the Women's Media Action Coalition's "Women's Media Summit White Paper on Gender Inequality in Film and Television" (09/2017). 
 
Kathleen is also a Voices Matter coalition signatory on the Open Letter to Marin Theatre Company and to Our National Theater Community which has received considerable press including San Francisco Chronicle and American Theatre.
 
She was interviewed on KPFA Women's Magazine (Oct. 16, 2017):
 
Kathleen also published the following HuffPost articles:
In November, Angela Becerra Vidergar spoke at the Library of Congress for the Radio Preservation Task Force conference.  Angela's participation was featured on the Hoover Institution website, here.  She is pictured above, giving her presentation.
 
Erica Cirillo-McCarthy presented on a panel titled "“Revolution Revisited: Theresa Enos’ Gender Roles and Faculty Lives in Rhetoric and Composition 2017” at the biannual Feminisms & Rhetorics Conference, October 4-7 in Dayton, OH. Erica and her collaborators' presented their work using their 2015 international survey on sexism in the academy and narrowed it down to 83 participants who self-identified as scholars in rhetoric and composition, professional and technical communication, and/or writing studies. In a new article, which they recently submitted to Peitho: Journal of the Coalition of Feminist Scholars in the History of Rhetoric & CompositionErica and her collaborators extend Theresa Enos’ seminal work, Gender Roles and Faculty Lives in Rhetoric and Composition, by identifying sexism and exclusion as it is located and exercised in relation to rhetoric and composition’s disciplinary work, ultimately demonstrating the need for increased vigilance to interventionary feminist strategies within our professional lives. Their larger project has already resulted in a chapter published in Holly Hassel and Kirsti Cole’s edited collection, Surviving Sexism in Academia: Strategies for Feminist Leadership, in July, 2017. 
 
On November 17, Jenae Cohn facilitated a workshop at Dominican University of California about ePortfolio pedagogy with Helen L. Chen, the director of ePortfolio intiatives at Stanford Universit. Jenae and Helen gave Dominican University faculty some ideas for how they might align ePortfolio pedagogy with both their institutional and their course learning outcomes while offering them opportunities to brainstorm ePortfolio-related class activities.
 
Meg Formato chaired a panel at the History of Science Society's Annual Meeting held this year in Toronto called "Scientific Intimacies." As she writes, "My takeaway from the conference on the whole was that there are a lot of  junior scholars trying to shift the polarities around what counts as scientific work. Some of these efforts involve seeing writing and communication of science as central to scientific practice, and the people who are involved in writing and communicating science, often women, contributing not just administrative work but also intellectual work to science. That's pretty exciting to me because that's work I do as well."
 
In addition, Meg gave a guest lecture at the Rhetoric Department at Berkeley on "Narrative, Image and Quantum Theory" on November 2. Her lecture detailed how quantum theorists struggled to find narrative forms capable of communicating their modern science and showed how collaborative dictation and writing practices are implicated in these narrative forms and guide quantum theorists' ideals for scientific communication. She also examined how the visual tropes and biographical conventions of the lone scientific genius swept in during the second half of the 20th century to obscure some of the more interesting parts of the story and made some of the people doing the collaborative work of quantum theory less visible.
 
Alex Greenhough presented a paper entitled "Feel Good: Taika Waititi's New Zealand Comedies" at the Society for Cinema and Media Studies annual conference, in Chicago. 
 
Becky Richardson had an article published this September in Studies in Romanticism:"Sent Here For Her Health: Accounting for Sanditon's Economies," Vol. 56 no. 2. p. 203-222. (Accessible through the MLA International Bibliography Database)

Beyond the Farm

This issue's Beyond the Farm spotlights Hume Director Zandra Jordan.  You probably wouldn't be surprised to come across Zandra showcasing her oral communication skills in conversations with faculty members or student groups on campus or at academic conferences like IWCA, but if you had happened to drop into the University AME Zion Church in Palo Alto a few weeks ago, you would have had an added treat: watching her deliver a sermon.  With Pastor Kaloma Smith away in Israel, Zandra was invited to deliver a two-part sermonic series: "Are You Thirsty Yet?" (John 4:1-15) on October 29; and "Embrace the Shift" (John 4:23-24) on November 5th.  In her sermons, Zandra invited congregants -- in her words -- "to consider the impact of replacing their everyday wells with an everlasting, life-giving supply."  Doree Allen was in the audience for the October 29th service, and writes,"I initially went to hear Zandra preach at the University AME Zion Church as a gesture of collegial support; however, I found myself completely drawn in by her wise eloquence and the warm embrace of the AME community.  Zandra's sermon was inspiring, thought-provoking, and deeply moving, especially in the context of these troubling times."   We at Stanford are clearly not the only ones who are delighted to have her join our community.